200 mile challenge of Leeds cancer dad

Sam Meek and his dad Ian.
Sam Meek and his dad Ian.
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A tumour patient has cycled 200 miles in 24 hours in his latest charity feat.

Today, only 48 hours after finishing the mammoth ride, Ian Meek was due to start his next round of chemotherapy on a brain tumour.

The dad-of-three, with a team of 37, cycled from Bristol to Bingley to raise cash for two brain tumour charities. He chose the route between the headquarters of Bristol-based Hammer Out and West Yorkshire-based Andrea’s Gift, as both have helped him and his family.

Mr Meek, from Kippax, Leeds, faced strong winds during the ride but he and other riders battled through to finish to rapturous applause from supporters.

Carol Robertson, charity development manager for Andrea’s Gift, said: “It was just absolutely incredible that they did it. It was so emotional when Ian finished, there were 50 or 60 people cheering him in.

“This would be such an achievement for anybody but when you think about what he has gone through - he had surgery at Christmas and was about to embark on chemo. He has such determination, it was never in doubt that he was going to do it.”

Among the riders was Mr Meek’s 14-year-old son Sam who also completed the whole journey. The Yorkshire Evening Post paperboy, a pupil at Brigshaw High School and Language College in Allerton Bywater, was also among walkers who did the national three peaks in 24 hours - his dad’s previous fundraising event.

The 41-year-old was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 1994. Initially it was benign but in 2009 he was told the tumour had become malignant and he has had various treatments.

However his illness hasn’t stopped him from fundraising and his Meek’s Three Peaks event last year raised £55,000 for Andrea’s Gift.

The latest Meek’s 200 Miles event has already collected more than £12,000 for the charity, an overall total of £68,000.

To contribute, log on to www.meeks200miles.org.uk

Brendon Ormsby, pictured in 2009.

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