Gig review: Super Furry Animals at O2 Academy Leeds

Super Furry Animals
Super Furry Animals
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Two decades have passed since the Super Furry Animals rose to prominence with luminescent 1996 debut album Fuzzy Logic, but on the evidence of this brilliant performance they have lost absolutely none of their sparkle.

The Welsh psychedelic rockers got back together again in 2015 after a six year hiatus and, after playing to sell out venues, decided to tour a back-to-back set of Fuzzy Logic and and its 1997 follow-up, Radiator.

The SFA, who formed in Cardiff in 1993, are marking their 20th anniversary of their first long-player with a “re-evaluated, restored” reissue that came out in multiple formats on November 4.

An adoring Leeds crowd lapped up a set which began with Show Me Magic to kick things off nicely.

The performance is married with the trademark boiler suits, calling cards and a strobe set-up.

Crowd pleasers included Something 4 the Weekend, If You Don’t Want Me to Destroy You (my personal SFA favourite) and Fuzzy Birds from the first album.

There is an apt tribute to Howard Marks, the late fellow Welshman who passed away last year, having spent the latter part of his life in Leeds.

Radiator is also proved to have aged just as well as its predecessor, whipping the room into a frenzy during highlights like Play It Cool and The International Language of Screaming.

Crowd pleasers included Something 4 the Weekend, If You Don’t Want Me to Destroy You (my personal SFA favourite) and Fuzzy Birds from the first album.

When album number two was played there were strong reactions for Demons, Play it Cool and the chant along Hermann Loves Pauline.

The energy of the audience dipped though for tracks such as Bass Tuned to D.E.A.D, Down a Different River and Long Gone. SFA stray from the double-album format and treat us to a typically barnstorming encore in the shape of traditional closer The Man Don’t Give a F***, originally released between both albums.

Stirring stuff and the perfect crescendo.

Everything Everything. Picture: Andrew Whitton

Music interview – Everything Everything: ‘You rarely get to make four LPs on a major label these days, especially bands with our kind of dubious success’