Gig review: Dodgy at The Cockpit

Dodgy at the Cockpit, Leeds. Picture: Anthony Longstaff

Dodgy at the Cockpit, Leeds. Picture: Anthony Longstaff

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Dodgy never made the impact of bands such as Oasis, Blur and Pulp during the Britpop era of the mid-Nineties, but they nevertheless made their mark.

Almost two decades on, Nigel Clark and his pals are still strutting their stuff to good effect.

They were in town on Friday as part of a tour to promote their latest album, Stand Upright In A Cool Place.

Lead singer Clark is a charismatic figure and often chatted to the small but intimate crowd throughout the evening, which lasted almost two hours.

Drummer Mathew Priest’s banter with Clark and the audience was similarly entertaining.

The make-up of the crowd was curious to say the least: students, thirty-somethings like myself, middle-aged couples, but the set itself could not be faulted.

However, for a band who are best known for their hits of well over a decade ago, it was slightly disappointing that so few of these were played.

That said, the quality of their more recent material from their latest album compensated for that.

And as the night drew to a close, we were treated to a number of Dodgy classics, such as Good Enough, which predictably went down a storm.

This was typical Britpop, thoroughly enjoyable, and a telling reminder of a bygone era.

Dodgy’s place in it is assured but they have perhaps surpassed themselves with their latest album Stand Upright In A Cool Place.

In the process, they may well have picked up a whole new generation of fans.

Gig date: May 24

From left to right, Faye Tozer, Lee Latchford-Evans, ?Claire Richards, Ian "H" Watkins and Lisa Scott-Lee. PIC: PA

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