Gig review: DMA’s at Unity Hall, Wakefield

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Whether it be the military jackets and pork pie hats of The Libertines or the ripped jeans and haircuts of The Cribs, when a band makes an impact on their fans fashion sense you’ve already won half the battle for cult status.

Between the Burberry shirts and baseball caps of the crowd, you’d be forgiven for mistaking each fan as a carbon copy of the band on stage. Fan loyalty and passion to this extent has not been seen since the heady days of mid 00’s indie.

DMA’s are very much akin to the aforementioned bands, in that their live shows are truly where the band and the music shines. Their on stage confidence is far more than arrogant swagger, the audience is feeding back every bit of energy and every last word proving this bands cock-sure attitude is justified.

Playing tracks from debut Hills End, DMA’s fire through a set replete with fan favourites Step Up The Morphine, Delete and Lay Down.

To see the venue go crazy for this band is like the early gigs I attended in Wakefield such as Arctic Monkeys and Kaiser Chiefs. Shirts and shoes were strewn across the venue, crowd surfers and friends on peoples shoulders, empty beer cups that had previously been showered across the room, all signs of a truly wild gig.

Wakefield has some great venues, and it was an honour to share the evening with fans as far and wide as Scotland and London. To head to a relatively small city just to catch a glimpse of this breakthrough band is testament to DMA’s talent and strong following. If you can catch them now at their rawest in intimate venues you will not be disappointed.

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