Leeds United Dream Team: Your favourite left back revealed

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The man affectionately known as TC is your cream of the crop in our vote to find the best left-back to have ever worn the famous white jersey of Leeds United.

But it was a compelling race, with an Aussie and similarly-cool operator by the name of Tony Dorigo displaying all the competitive tendencies associated with someone from that ultra-competitive sports-mad nation, pushing Cas lad Cooper all the way.

With the votes in and counted, Cooper polled 47 per cent, with 1990s full-back Dorigo in second place with 37 per cent.

There was support for our other candidates, including another TC not on our list in Trevor Cherry and another Don Revie stalwart in Paul Madeley, although, rest assured, it may not be the last we’ll see of that pair in terms of nominations for our ultimate Leeds United “dream team”.

But in terms of the left-back berth, take a bow Terry!

Cooper burst on to the scene in 1967, just as Revie’s United were making the rest of the country start to sit up and take notice.

Effectively replacing another of our candidates in Willie Bell, the overlapping tendencies of the gifted Cooper – who started his career as a winger – became the stuff of legend in the glory years at Elland Road.

Scoring the winner in Leeds’ first success at Wembley, in the League Cup final against Arsenal in 1968, certainly boosted his fan club. And he had a cool pair of white boots.

International recognition was not far away, his pinnacle arriving in the 1970 World Cup finals in Mexico when he prospered against the greatest side that has ever crossed the white line in Brazil’s samba specials.

Summing things up nicely, yellandroar e-mailed: “Terry Cooper was world class – Pele cited him, along with Gordon Banks and Bobby Charlton, as players who were good enough to play for Brazil (and he was writing in the context of the great 1970 World Cup-winning side).”

He added: “Tony Dorigo and Trevor Cherry were certainly international class and I think Dorigo in full flight was one of the treasures of the Wilko era.”

originalkoppite said: “Terry Cooper was not a speedy player, but he was the first of the modern full-backs capable of beating his man three times to get to a position where he could put in a good cross.”

Bubionwhite said: “Terry Cooper by a mile from Trevor Cherry followed by a yard to Frankie Gray – How SG (Simon Grayson) must wish he could have any one of the three.”

Another example of the “roving commission” full-back was Melbourne-born Dorigo, whose effortless classy style and coolness under pressure won scores of fans, particularly during United’s never-to-be-forgotten Division One title triumph of 1991-92.

Polished and pristine were two words to sum up Dorigo, whose former captain, Gordon Strachan, famously once said that while he always got the job done, he never looked dirty.

One e-mail said: “The cry ‘You’ll never beat Dorigo’ was heard around Elland Road for many years and I never worried about any opposition with Dorigo in the back four. One of the few players who could have got into the Revie team.”

While Cooper and Dorigo ensured pretty much a two-horse race, Peter Craggs admitted to being a tad rueful that the sands of time meant that his candidate – Grenville Hair – couldn’t have plied his trade in United’s glory years.

He e-mailed: “Hair was a solid full-back, but he was also a good footballer. It’s a pity he wasn’t 10 years younger for he would have given Terry Cooper a run for his money.”

How you voted

Terry Cooper 47%, Tony Dorigo 37%, Ian Harte 11%, Frank Gray 3%, Willie Bell 0%, Wilf Copping 1%, John Milburn 1%, Grenville Hair 0%.

Kalvin Phillips celebrates scoring Leeds' second goal of the game Picture by Simon Hulme

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