YEP Letters: June 20

Dave Brown.
Dave Brown.
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Check out today’s YEP letters.

A great bit of Yorkshire textile!

Dave Brown, Moor End Road, Halifax

Have you ever had one of those moments when you glance at something and it sends you back to a time many years ago?

Since retiring and riding the local buses with my bus pass, something familiar has caught my eye – the bus seat material. This particular design was manufactured by John Holdsworth and the reason I recognised it was that I worked there in the 90s. I spent a few years at the Holdsworth factory and saw a few hundred rolls of seating material which were supplied to local and Canadian bus companies as well as the Orient Express. I am proud of the fact that this has lasted 25 years and is still going strong.

I really enjoyed my time there. All the workforce ranging from the directors to the shop floor were fantastic to work with – happy days.

We must not be cast adrift in search of port

James Bovington,Horsforth

Personal circumstances have prevented me from playing as full a role in urging a ‘Remain’ vote as I might have liked but I am convinced that voting to stay in the EU and working for the changes that will make it function better is the best course for Britain.

Along with Nato, the EU is one of the two major organisations that provide the architecture which has ensured that peace has by and large been kept in Europe over the last 60 or so years.

No one was keener to encourage the nations behind the Iron Curtain to throw off what she perceived as the tyrannical yoke of communism than Mrs Margaret Thatcher who assured those states that they would be welcome in an enlarged EU. This is now the reality that we have. If in this globalised, inter-dependent world Britain wants to continue playing a fundamental role in shaping the future of our continent then it can best do that from within an evolving EU, remaining part of the largest transnational trading block in the world. We might be an island but isolation is dangerous and not splendid. We must avoid a situation in which the good ship Britannia floats round the world in search of a friendly port. Outside the EU we would be much more at the mercy of events. The EU really is the only game in town.

Those contemplating destroying this should also reflect on the fact that on the beautiful but fateful morning of July 1, 1916 the British Army suffered over 57,000 casualties in what was its worst ever day for losses as the Battle of the Somme broke out at the height of the conflict which opposed the leading nations of Europe. Let’s remember that peace is best assured through co-operation and sharing of sovereignty, the whole point of the EU and which will best be achieved by a strong vote to Remain.

Either way it is the end of EU

C R Lancaster, Guiseley

In 1999 ‘Project Fear’ centred around what was described as the ‘millennium bug’. Politicians, scientists, economists and academics predicted that aircraft would fall from the sky, the banking system would collapse, the economy would go into freefall and anything controlled by a computer would malfunction the second that clocks turned past midnight on December 31. They attempted to terrify the public into believing that absolute chaos would prevail throughout the world. In the event very little, if anything, of any significance happened.

In 2016 ‘Project Fear’ is predicting a stock market collapse, economic chaos, mass unemployment and even a third world war should we choose to leave the EU.

In that event, yes, there will be a period of uncertainty as business takes stock and the stock market may fall for a period as we negotiate our 
exit.

But with the German and French economies flat lining, Greece about to renege on its bail out agreement again, the Irish, Spanish, Italian, Portugese and other southern European economies in free fall, a migrant crisis on the EU borders and the threat of terrorist activity these are situations to which the EU seems incapable of finding resolutions, and will ultimately and inevitably result in the total collapse and break up of the EU, throwing all 28 member states into a lengthy period of instability, chaos, unrest and public disobedience .

So does it really matter which way we vote? Either way we will be out of the EU in the next five to 10 years. Our only consideration should be whether we leave now in an orderly and civilised manner and forge new relationships and trade agreements with the rest of the world, or risk the chaos which will ensue as the disfunctional EU slowly and painfully sinks into the mists of time.

Public should have their say

D Angood, Leeds

Having managed an invite I attended the transport summit as a concerned citizen, concerned about the lack of a positive motivation regarding the provision of a proficient transport system for the area.

The summit was interesting but the only idea of any substance came from the floor and that was to make more use of the inland waterways for freight traffic, Leeds Dock being an integral part of that strategy.

The speakers and remaining ideas were more abstract and were about the considerations that could, should be given to various modes of transport 
and the end users. An important point that was omitted was any form of time scale which I believe should have been factored into the agenda.

We were informed that Leeds would “tap into the best national and international brains”, the so called “experts and consultants” whose input into the NGT and cycle highway have been proved to be very questionable. Surely the most salient point in the initial stages is to ask the people who will be using the system as to what they want and how it should be provided?

Several questions need to be answered prior to any costs for “experts or consultants” being incurred and any proposals from said people should be made at their own cost. There have to be plans, ideas, schemes etc put forward before any consultations, discussions or debates can occur.

Will the council invite them or wait and see if there is any reaction to the summit?

Will the council have constraints on those who wish to submit proposals?

Will those who submit these ideas be allowed to present them in person?

In what format, if any, will the ideas, plans etc have to be submitted and on what time scale?

If appraisal is to be a factor, who will decide upon the members of the panel or committee and what will its configuration be?

When a viable and feasible scheme has been adopted then that is the time to consult people as to its implementation, construction and operation.

Is it time to ban crash drivers?

Ernest Lundy, by email

John Hall, chairman of Tesco’s, says leaving the EU would put thousands of small budding businesses at the risk of closure. That’s a bit like the kettle calling the frying pan black. The proliferation of stores and supermarkets in shopping centres has done just that. Mr Hall may perhaps be well intentioned, but he would have been better advised to produce a more thought out statement.

There has also been news today, as always, of a numerous traffic accidents up and down the country. No doubt this is to be expected as the volume of traffic increases daily. Perhaps it is time to review intently all who are regularly involved! And those found to be culpable, should they not be banned off the road completely, and only allowed back after rigorous testing?

This would be much better idea than conforming to regular requests to re-test older drivers who, as with new young drivers are subjected to age discrimination in the way insurers charge disproportionate costs for cover, even when they are claims and accident free.

The songs that made Leeds sing

Jennifer Bookbinder, by email

I was surprised that the YEP did not give any coverage at all to the utterly brilliant ‘One Last Time’ at Leeds Arena last Saturday evening.

Barry Manilow was the ultimate slick professional artiste who held the audience in the palm of his hand.

I only hope that it is not the last time that Leeds will see him.

Bernard Kenny, the man who tried to save Jo Cox from her attacker.

YEP Letters: August 16