Democratic benefits of WikiLeaks

FOLLOWING the recent turbulence caused by the recent WikiLeaks, there should be cause for optimism in what is our guarded secretive society.

I draw this opinion from the countless times over the years that I have heard citizens of this country referring to our politicians and local leaders as them, "they do this" etc.

So distant seems the relationship and perceived difference between the ordinary citizen and elected members, you would not think we are really the power brokers manoeuvring change come election time.

With the internet, the barn door is truly open and there is little chance of it closing as the appetite for investigations grow. In the best case scenario there is the opportunity to disengage mistruths – and the potential to stop wars and alter bad decisions has never been greater.

So why don't we keep these doors open post any impending prosecutions from the leaks, and encourage the continuation of openness? Otherwise we may as well return to a very Victorian society of them and us plus cap-doffing.

Finally, any other WikiLeaks could reveal just who indeed is batting for the deserving poor. Let there be more articulate advocates on some of the growing problems that have arisen from the often badly portrayed misinformation delivered by some of the less principled tabloids.

KENDAL WILSON, Tadcaster

Bernard Kenny, the man who tried to save Jo Cox from her attacker.

YEP Letters: August 16