A kingdom no longer united?

IS there an English revolution in the making?

As the student rebellion gathers momentum (infiltrated by anarchist elements) over the massive increase in tutition fees in England, it opens up a whole new can of worms spilling out over the borders.

The reality sinks in that Scots students will pay nothing and the Welsh only the current rate, while the English pay the most.

Along with the injustice to English students, it has once again alerted the long-suffering English, looking at the broader picture, of the social apartheid of how the English shoulder the burden of subsidising the Celtic fringe.

These anomalies are caused by Labour's ill-thought-out devolution settlement, under the so-called Barnet formula, whereby the English subsidise both the Scots Parliament and Welsh assembly, so that money is spent per head of population than is the case in England. The devolved governments are given greater resources to spend as they wish.

In the case of Scotland, the choice is to divert funds to abolish tutition fees and importantly, to improve health provision, the latter, superior in many cases than south of the border. There are more doctors, nurses etc, as well as "free" prescriptions. This health apartheid is causing bitter resentment in England and is likely to provoke greater fury when the cuts begin to bite much deeper in England than over the borders.

No government of any main party will dare to dismantle the devolution settlement, never mind attaching the patent injustice of the subsidy. The consensus about devolution is wrong, as it grossly favours the other nations in the union.

The Scots in particular, will never vote with their feet for independence, because they know where their bread is buttered, but will push and push for even greater autonomy with a larger share of the cake, prised from English taxpayers.

The drive now surely is for an all-English Parliament for all English affairs and a complete revision of the devolution settlements.

Brian Johnston, Burmantofts

Anger over bins

LAST week, as I came out of my house, I saw a bin lorry slowly disappear at the end of my street. It was only in late afternoon when I read a notice in my Evening Post that I realised that the collection date had been moved forward.

I telephoned Leeds City Council to complain about the stupidity of putting a notice in the paper after the bin collection service had come and gone.

Initially, I was kept waiting for 25 minutes. When I finally got through I was told that they would try to come back, and that I could advise all other householders in our street to leave their bins out until they are emptied.

Over the last six weeks a good waste collection service has become an absolute shambles. I do not blame the politicians, as this is clearly a management issue.

However, given this situation, I would urge them to call to account the extremely well paid council officers in charge of this service.

Bill Birch, Beeston

Having read in your paper on December 22, 'Bin boss admits route shake-up will save only 300,000', I wonder how much the backlog of empting the bins after Christmas will cost.

We were told in the YEP that our black bins were being emptied a day early because of Christmas; oops our bins are usually emptied on Wednesday, so this information was too late for those who have their bins emptied on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

B Appleby, Leeds 10

Amazing staff

ON December 3, our granddaughter was born in the delivery suite, Gledhow Wing, St James's Hospital. The love, dedication and professionalism of the staff made the whole experience amazing. I was privileged to be present at the birth and will remember it forever.

Our NHS is the best and the people who work to provide this service deserve to be recognised and protected.

God bless you all.

Mr and Mrs Andrews and family, Rothwell

YEP Letters: April 22