Yorks girl, 8, in stroke ordeal

Boothroyd Junior & Infant School pupil eight-year-old Sabia Hussain who was nominated for an award by her teacher Susan Waites, after she suffered a stroke.

Boothroyd Junior & Infant School pupil eight-year-old Sabia Hussain who was nominated for an award by her teacher Susan Waites, after she suffered a stroke.

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BRAVE Sabia Hussain has battled her way back to health after suffering a stroke at just SEVEN years old.

The determined youngster, now eight, went through many months of rehabilitation at Leeds General Infirmary after the rare attack – and now wants to be a doctor.

Mum Shazia, 30, said: “I never thought it was a stroke. I had never thought it could affect a small child. She had to learn everything again, like a baby. It was hard for her but she kept trying. I am so proud of her.

“I want to thank the staff at LGI and teachers for giving me my daughter back, and getting her back on her feet again.”

Sabia collapsed in a PE lesson at Boothroyd Primary School in Dewsbury last year. Her whole right side was left paralysed, but now she has taught herself to write again with her left

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hand, goes swimming and even completed a mile-long cave walk with her classmates.

Recalling the “devastating” day when she got the news, Mrs Hussain said: “I got a phone call from the school and they said she had fainted. She was lying in her teacher’s lap. Her eyes were open but she was not speaking. “There were no tears in her eyes but I knew she wanted to say something. I was devastated, and felt like I was dying myself. She had two days of tests at LGI and then I was told there was a blockage in her brain and that’s why this had happened.”

Sabia, who is still having regular speech and physiotherapy sessions, said: “I want to get back to how I used to be. Sometimes I forget things but I keep working on it and then I remember. The doctors and my teachers have helped me a lot.”

The youngster has just won a regional ‘Life After Stroke’ award from the Stroke Association and was treated to a free shopping spree by Next after they heard of her bravery.

Teacher Susan Waites, who nominated her, said: “Sabia had true grit and determination that she did not need help and that she would do it herself. She was always a clever girl, this was just a stumbling block for her. “She just does not know the word ‘no’ and has such a positive attitude - she is an inspiration to us all.”

A spokesman for the Leeds Children’s Hospital at LGI said: “Sabia is a brave and determined little girl.”

Just 400 children a year are affected by strokes, as opposed to 150,000 adults. Two thirds of sufferers die within 10 days or are left permanently brain damaged.

aisha.iqbal@ypn.co.uk

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