YEP Says: The essential battle to bridge the digital divide

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for our CHILDREN to succeed in life, they must have a good understanding of the internet.

From banking to news, booking holidays to social contact with friends, the internet is woven deeply into our everyday lives.

And children who don’t have even the most basic of IT skills risk becoming third class citizens.

But it’s not just children who may suffer. People of all ages can – and should – benefit from the digital age.

So the fact that 45,000 households in Leeds do not have access to the web through broadband or landline is a cause of concern.

Leeds is hosting the Leeds Digital Festival which is celebrating the growth of the digital sector which employs many thousands of people in our city and is set to employ thousands moren in the years to come.

Leeds City Council is concerned at the so-called digital divide which means many people stand no chance of enjoying the digital boom.

They want more ‘digital inclusion’. The council wants to raise awareness of the support available for building digital skills, particularly to “those who are more likely to benefit the most”. And the council wants to explore the potential for a ‘digital development programme’ where council staff can help educate people in their own homes.

This isn’t just important: It is essential.

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