YEP Says, May 28: Time to show us the money for a seven-day NHS

0
Have your say

THE inclusion in yesterday’s Queen’s Speech of the pledge to turn the NHS into a seven-day operation which delivers an excellent standard of care around the clock is a welcome restatement of the Government’s determination to effect a sea change for patients.

THE inclusion in yesterday’s Queen’s Speech of the pledge to turn the NHS into a seven-day operation which delivers an excellent standard of care around the clock is a welcome restatement of the Government’s determination to effect a sea change for patients.

Yet such a priority stands starkly at odds with the latest cost-cutting exercises at local hospitals. Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, for instance, is likely to be £40m in the red by the end of this financial year.

Involved in a three-year turnaround process, it has been told it must make savings of £67m, equivalent to around six per cent of its total budget.

The problem is that in order to deliver the improved service David Cameron is promising, the Trust needs to recruit more clinical staff rather than reduce their numbers. This, inevitably, costs money.

An ageing population has contributed to doctors carrying out a staggering 40 million more consultations a year compared to just seven years ago. At the same time, replacements for retiring GPs are thin on the ground and the nation’s hospitals have become over-reliant on foreign doctors and nurses.

If David Cameron is serious about providing an NHS that is fit for the 21st century, then it is time for him to put our money where his mouth is.

Use or risk losing our local libraries

THE closure of a local library is always a cause for concern and, among those who stand to be affected, a source of deep sadness.

For residents in Methley who are regular visitors to their library its replacement with a mobile service will be little consolation.

However, the reality is that they were in the minority and the low numbers using the building have persuaded the council that its continued operation has now become unviable.

The statistics showed that visits and items issued had dropped significantly over the past two years. The sad truth is that if we don’t use services such as these, we risk losing them.

The Yorkshire Post launched its Loneliness campaign in 2014

YEP says: Time to start talking to end loneliness