YEP Says, May 11: We have to stop failing our elderly in care homes

0
Have your say

IT’S no secret that there is a huge amount of pressure on elderly care in this country. People are living for longer and the cost of looking after them is growing.

IT’S no secret that there is a huge amount of pressure on elderly care in this country. People are living for longer and the cost of looking after them is growing.

At the same time, the level of national debt means that the funds available in the past are not there – or at least those that can be committed are failing to keep up with demand.

With council-run care homes having been closed to save money, it means that it is more important than ever to ensure standards at privately-run residential homes are up to scratch.

So it is deeply troubling that the YEP reports today on a catalogue of failings at care homes across the city.

Distressed residents pacing up and down corridors, failures to report alleged abuse appropriately and unhygienic facilities have all been flagged up in damning inspection reports. In fact, more than two-thirds of recently inspected Leeds facilities have now been deemed to be inadequate or requiring improvement.

This is a shocking situation and the council is right to stop sending people to homes where they are unlikely to receive the level of care they have every right to expect.

Eldery care was not an issue that featured heavily in the election campaign, but it is clear that it is one which needs addressing as a matter of extreme urgency.

Misery of long journey to work

HERE’S another issue that needs urgent attention. Figures show that the average commute for Leeds workers is 40 minutes each way.

Time is money and if they were being paid for that journey it would add an extra £4,600 to their pay packets.

What’s worse is that an official Leeds City Council predicts the number of extra jobs that will be created in the middle of the city over the next decade will generate an extra 10,000 morning peak commuting trips.

Leeds remains Europe’s largest city without a rapid transit system – and until that changes it will continue to be held back.

PIC: Jonathan Gawthorpe

YEP Says: Celebrating Leeds’s art credentials