YEP Says, January 4: Supporters hold key in long-running row over policing costs

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...and signs that city living is now here to stay

THE issue of who exactly should pay for the cost of policing football matches is by no means a new one.

Back in 2012, West Yorkshire Police lost a High Court case which ruled the force overcharged Leeds United for “special police services” on match days.

It was forced to pay back £1.2m and last August United claimed they were still owed a further £800,000.

The reason the issue is the source of so much debate is down to the hefty sums involved.

And it’s a debate that will be reignited by the figures in today’s YEP which show that the taxpayer was hit with a burden of £204,000 for policing United’s home games matches over the course of the 2013/14 campaign.

Clubs currently have to pay back only the costs incurred inside their ground or on their property, with the rest coming from police budgets.

The Association of Chief Police Officers has previously called for clubs to pay all of the costs, and these will no doubt intensify as budgets continue to be stretched to the limit.

At the same time, however, the likes of Leeds United are not exactly flush with cash.

Of course, the problem would be solved at a stroke if there was a guarantee that every so-called supporter would behave themselves – like the vast majority do.

But then that’s probably too much to ask.

Signs that city living is now here to stay

IF you had told someone a few years ago that the city’s new rash of apartments would be filled to bursting point they would have laughed you out of town.

But after threatening to become modern day ghost towns, property expert Jonathan Morgan tells us today that occupancy rates are nudging the 100 per cent mark, bringing welcome vibrancy to the heart of the city. And he warns that more developments are urgently needed in order to keep pace with development across the rest of the city centre.

With a new city park lined up and more businesses now looking to tap into this growing market, it looks like city living might just be here to stay.

People attend a multi-faith vigil in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the Manchester terror attack. PIC: PA

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