YEP Says, February 6: Infrastructure is key challenge in future expansion of Leeds

1/5/01.... The rooftops of the Victorian Houses  of Harehills in Inner city Leeds   surround the Bilal Mosque on Harehills Lane  ,  whose Mineret towers  stand out against the rooftops and skyline

1/5/01.... The rooftops of the Victorian Houses of Harehills in Inner city Leeds surround the Bilal Mosque on Harehills Lane , whose Mineret towers stand out against the rooftops and skyline

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City estimated to need 70,000 new homes by 2028.

THE 70,000 new homes it’s estimated that Leeds will need by 2028 represent a vote of confidence in the city.

Forecasts that the population will increase by 100,000 over that period are certainly a far cry from the era when the number of people living here was steadily dwindling due to a crippling lack of confidence in the city’s long-term prospects.

As with all great cities, Leeds needs to keep evolving – not only to secure inward investment but also to attract the calibre of businesses and individuals who can take us forward.

When building such a large number of homes there are several factors to consider, the most obvious being where will they all be built. The council’s answer, sensibly, is to concentrate on the city centre.

Crucially, rather than swallowing up precious green space, around three-quarters of them will be built on brownfield land. The trick will be to provide sufficient incentives to ensure developers buy into this blueprint.

The real key to the successful amalgamation of what amounts to the addition of a medium-sized town, however, lies in putting in the right infrastructure.

Better transport links, more schools and increased health services will all be essential if Leeds is cope with this level of expansion.

These measures must be an intrinsic part of the planning process and should be provided as the new homes are built, not as an afterthought.

Help ensure cycleway lives up to its potential

EVERY so often, big projects arrive with perfect timing – and that’s certainly true of the Leeds super cycleway.

The scheme looks set to tap into the buzz generated by the city’s hosting of the Tour de France’s Grand Depart this summer, providing a direct and safe route for cyclists in and out of Leeds.

But first transport bosses are asking for input into the route and suggestions as to any potential improvements.

It’s a great opportunity for those who know the city best to ensure it delivers the most benefit to current cyclists and those who will take it up in the future.

After the Grand Depart, that could be a lot of people.

Launch of West Yorkshire Police Safe Pass Cycling Scheme, at Bramhope, Leeds..PC Tom Allen pictured on the road..3rd May 2017 ..Picture by Simon Hulme

Leeds cycle project finds its feet