YEP Says, August 20: It’s GCSEs day - where education for life begins

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TODAY is ‘make or break day’ for all those Yorkshire students receiving their GCSE results. Their grades will determine whether they can progress to A-levels, and possibly university, or undertake training tailor-made to their own career requirements and learning needs. It is important that every student has access to the very best careers advice – the decisions they take today will have a significant bearing on their future prospects. Choices need to be made which will enhance the future employment prospects of the individuals concerned so they can fulfil their potential.

TODAY is ‘make or break day’ for all those Yorkshire students receiving their GCSE results. Their grades will determine whether they can progress to A-levels, and possibly university, or undertake training tailor-made to their own career requirements and learning needs. It is important that every student has access to the very best careers advice – the decisions they take today will have a significant bearing on their future prospects. Choices need to be made which will enhance the future employment prospects of the individuals concerned so they can fulfil their potential.

This is borne out by claims, from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, that the labour market has become saturated with graduates who cannot find jobs that are commensurate with their qualifications. It says just under 60 per cent of graduates in the UK now work in non-graduate jobs while the figure is just 10 per cent in countries like Germany which do place a much stronger emphasis on vocational training. The report is another reminder about the need for even closer links between schools and employers. Today’s GCSE recipients should regard their results as the end of the beginning of their education rather than the beginning of the end. That’s the most important lesson of all on this landmark day.

Recognition for Leeds heroes

Heroes of all kinds feature in the pages of our newspaper today: On page five, we name the men who have saved lives in Leeds and been recognised and honoured by the Royal Humane Society. And then, on page 11, a hero of an altogether different kind. Rich Bell set up a crowdfunding page to raise money for an elderly burglary victim. He said he was ‘fed up with seeing negative things make and wanted to things a little better’. Good for him.

None of these people were forced to act for the sake of others - but undoubtedly they didn’t think twice (and in the case of the river rescuers, didn’t hesitate to risk their own lives to save another’s). Thank goodness for the kindness of strangers.

People attend a multi-faith vigil in St Ann's Square, Manchester, to remember the victims of the Manchester terror attack. PIC: PA

Why we must not stop living our lives our way