YEP Says: Sign of the times - are bus lane fines fair on drivers?

Should councils give drivers a warning the first time they stray into a bus lane?
Should councils give drivers a warning the first time they stray into a bus lane?
8
Have your say

LIKE it or not, traffic restrictions exist for good reason – namely to keep vehicles moving in the region’s town and city centres.

It’s the same with bus lanes – their existence makes public transport a more attractive proposition and reduces car dependency.

If the rules of the road are not enforced, and ordinary drivers allowed to use these special lanes with impunity, it defeats the object of the exercise.

That said, local authorities are honour-bound to provide clear signs – and there’s growing evidence to suggest that some councils are failing with this requirement.

This is highlighted by the high percentage of out-of-town drivers who are receiving penalty charges for inadvertently straying into bus lanes.

Though they, as the driver, are ultimately responsible, there’s a belief that some cameras are being deliberately positioned to raise as much revenue as possible for the local authorities concerned.

If there’s a spike in the number of motoring offences at a particular location, it would be better – for all concerned – if councils reviewed the effectiveness, or otherwise, of the signs at the location in question rather than simply squeezing every last penny out of drivers who have come, in recent times, to feel persecuted by national and local government alike.

After all, there are far more motoring offences which cause a far greater threat to road safety and which demand zero tolerance enforcement – namely the generation of drivers who still think it is acceptable to use their mobile phone while they’re behind the wheel.

Sisters Jane and Lucy Batham at the Tarte and Berry bakery in Farsley, Leeds. Picture: Simon Hulme

Delight for sisters as Leeds bakery wins Selfridges’s seal of approval