Video: Leeds West Indian Carnival explosion of colour and culture

The stage has been set for the annual spectacle that will be the Leeds West Indian Carnival on Bank Holiday Monday.

On Friday night a sea of colour, parades, floats and costumes descended on the West Yorkshire Playhouse in Quarry Hill.

Seph Condor and Pareesha Webster, two of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, give a sneak peek of their costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday. 26 August 2016.  Picture Bruce Rollinson

Seph Condor and Pareesha Webster, two of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, give a sneak peek of their costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday. 26 August 2016. Picture Bruce Rollinson

Festival goers from all around the UK joined in to show off their glittering and grand outfits as they vied for the honour of being crowned the Leeds Carnival King or Queen.

It is one of the main elements to the festival which is already gearing up to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2017.

Show time last night was hosted by Eddie Nestor and Robbie Gee and also featured music from New World Steel Orchestra, Cherie Jay and Melvin Zakers.

Monday’s events get off to an early start - so much so that you can turn up in pjs and onesies - with a J-Ouvert music jam from the West Indian Centre on Laycock Road at 6.30am.

Seth Condor is helped into his costume by his father Hubon, one of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, gives a sneak peek of his costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday.
26 August 2016.  Picture Bruce Rollinson

Seth Condor is helped into his costume by his father Hubon, one of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, gives a sneak peek of his costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday. 26 August 2016. Picture Bruce Rollinson

Over the space of two hours it will wake up the neighbours on Savile Mount, Chapeltown Road, Harehills Avenue, Spencer Place, Louis Street and then back to the centre.

Later in the day the carnival explodes with colour, costumes, rhythm and sound for the main parade which will be led by the carnival king and queen, as well as the prince and princess.

Thousands of people are expected to take part with even more turning up to spectate.

Potternewton Park will be transformed into a sea of Caribbean culture with global cuisine, arts, crafts a funfair and children’s rides.

The Leeds West Indian Carnival at Chapeltown, Leeds. Arthur France pictured at the Carnival..26th August 2013.Picture by Simon Hulme

The Leeds West Indian Carnival at Chapeltown, Leeds. Arthur France pictured at the Carnival..26th August 2013.Picture by Simon Hulme

The parade leaves at 2pm and returns at around 5pm for a judging of the costumes.

Arthur France is the founder of the carnival which started back in 1967 and he is already looking ahead to the landmark celebrations planned for next year.

He said: “As well bringing the streets of Leeds to life with the colour, spectacle and unbeatable atmosphere that have attracted millions of visitors and millions to the economy, Leeds Carnival 2016 gives culture in the city yet another chance to shine.

“We are already receiving national and international queries from carnival fans planning to be in the city for our 50th anniversary next year. As well as being a huge milestone, 2017 will be a fantastic opportunity for Leeds to show the world how proud we are of this event that unites people from all walks of life. To make sure that we get it right, this year’s Carnival has to be the biggest dress rehearsal Leeds has ever seen.”

Seth Condor and Pareesha Webster, two of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, give a sneak peek of their costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday.
26 August 2016.  Picture Bruce Rollinson

Seth Condor and Pareesha Webster, two of the talented designers hoping to win the title of Carnival King and Queen at this year's Leeds West Indian Carnival, give a sneak peek of their costumes ahead of this year's parade which will take place in front of more than 100,000 people on the streets of Leeds on August Bank Holiday. 26 August 2016. Picture Bruce Rollinson

People look at flowers outside the Town Hall in Albert Square, Manchester. PIC: PA

Manchester terror attack police investigating ‘network’ over concert bombing