New number plate-reading speed cameras catch thousands of motorists - and they could come to Yorkshire

There were 6,166 fines handed out for drivers breaking the speed limit in just one 800-metre stretch of road into Birmingham city centre in the year to September.
There were 6,166 fines handed out for drivers breaking the speed limit in just one 800-metre stretch of road into Birmingham city centre in the year to September.
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An average speed camera pilot scheme has slashed offences and seen more than 500 speeding tickets a month clocked up at one hotspot.

An average speed camera pilot scheme has slashed offences and seen more than 500 speeding tickets a month clocked up at one hotspot.

The pilot is taking place in the West Midlands but a police boss has already said he wants to work with other councils 'to roll out the scheme further'.

There were 6,166 fines handed out for drivers breaking the speed limit in just one 800-metre stretch of road into Birmingham city centre in the year to September.

The hotspot on Bristol Road, where there is a 30mph limit, is among several sites across the West Midlands where the new number plate-reading speed cameras have been trialled.

A formal review of the scheme will happen in 2018, although it is slated to last up to five years.

But those behind the pilot have welcomed the first-year findings, which revealed speeding in the targeted areas was cut by 14% on average.

Cameras were installed at 14 sites across Birmingham and Solihull in a partnership involving Birmingham City Council, Solihull Metropolitan Borough Council and West Midlands Police - which processes the fines.

Stewart Stacey, the city council's roads chief, said: "These cameras are not about making money, but about encouraging motorists to think about and change their behaviour on the roads, to make them safer for all who use them.

"These figures for the first 12 months are extremely encouraging as they show that motorists are taking notice and, crucially, modifying the way they drive."

West Midlands police and crime commissioner David Jamieson said the findings were "very encouraging" and he wanted to work with other councils "to roll out the scheme further".

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