How this weekend's train strike will affect services across Yorkshire

Rail services will be affected by strike action this weekend.
Rail services will be affected by strike action this weekend.
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Northern rail has announced an amended timetable of services covering the three-day strike taking place over the weekend and early next week.

Members of rail union RMT will strike on Saturday to Monday, July 8 to 10, with up to 60 per cent of Northern’s usual timetabled services cancelled.

The services which are running will be supplemented by additional rail replacement buses.

Sharon Keith, regional director for Northern - which runs a number of services from Leeds including to Sheffield, Doncaster, Bradford Forster Square and York - said: “Being able to run more than 40 per cent of services means we will be able to keep the north of England on the move. Our amended timetables have been developed to provide the best possible cover across the three days and to try to best meet the needs of our leisure customers at the weekend and commuters on Monday.”

On Saturday and Monday, most routes will run between 7am-7pm. Sunday services will run from 9-5.

Northern have urged their customers to allow extra time for journeys, plan carefully and consider whether travel is necessary.

“We have worked to prioritise services on our busiest routes, at the busiest times of day. But we expect all services to be busy and ask our customers to plan ahead accordingly,” said Ms Keith.

The strike is a further result of the dispute around train guards’ safety.

RMT say that making trains ‘Driver Only Operated’ - as Northern franchise operator Arriva Rail North plans to - is unsafe for both staff and the public. Picket lines will be made at key Northern routes.

For the full timetable and more information on the strike, visit www.northernrailway.co.uk/industrial-action

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