Thousands take part in Yorkshire Marathon

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

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Triumphant athletes, an octogenarian, hopeful first-timers and fundraisers in their thousands pounded pavements during the Yorkshire Marathon.

Around 9,000 people took in the historical landmarks of York during races which included the main route, a 10-mile challenge and wheelchair race on Sunday.

Paul Martelletti, a New Zealander who lives in London, won the main Plusnet Yorkshire Marathon, crossing the finish line at York University after starting there two hours, 19 minutes and 36 seconds earlier.

Mr Martelletti, 37, said: “I feel great. It’s awesome that I won but I really worked for it.”

He was followed by Tom Charles and Scott Harrington.

Sarah Lowery, 34, of Sheffield Running Club, was the female winner of the marathon, clocking in at two hours, 45 minutes and 53 seconds.

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

She said: “I’m going to do lots of eating and lots of drinking – all the things I’ve not been able to do for four months.”

Joasia Zakrzewski and Michelle Nolan came second and third in the women’s competition.

Joe Sagar, 22, of Spenborough Athletics Club, won the 10-mile race in 54 minutes and one second. Victoria Whitehead, 42, of the Valley Striders, took the top spot in the women’s 10-mile with a time of one hour, two minutes and 44 seconds.

Leeds’s Callum Hall, 24, won the wheelchair race in two hours, one minute and 35 seconds.

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

Runners make there way past York Minster on the Yorkshire Marathon

He was closely followed by Chris Nash and Paralympian Jade Jones.

She said: “I really enjoyed it, it was a tough course – a bit up and down. But you don’t realise when you’re doing it. There were people all the way along cheering and really excited to see a marathon in Yorkshire.”

Ray Matthews, a 75-year-old man from Maltby, South Yorkshire, last month completed his mission to run 75 marathons in 75 days for Rotherham’s Newman School, which helps people with special needs and disabilities.

Yesterday he helped to open the event before taking part in the 10-mile route. He said: “It sounds a bit crazy but that was only 10 miles. I’ve enjoyed being able to talk to people and help people.

Paul Martelletti wins the Marathon. Picture by Simon Hulme

Paul Martelletti wins the Marathon. Picture by Simon Hulme

“I don’t know what it is, (but) I’ve got something that allows me to be able to run and the main thing is, as you get older, you’ve got to not let being 75 be a hindrance.”

But Jean Snelling, of the York Knavesmire Harriers, was the event’s oldest participant at 80. After finishing 10 miles she said that her marathon place is already booked for 2017.

“I didn’t start running until I was 62 and the Harriers got me going. Since then I’ve done 14 or 15 marathons.”

Ex-serviceman Alex Pearl, of York, raised more than £800 towards Help for Heroes by taking part in the 10-mile race with a 25kg rucksack on his back.

“I felt I should go through the suffering, pain and training they do,” he said.

The Yorkshire Post is media partner for the marathon, which is part of the lasting legacy of the late fundraiser and campaigner Jane Tomlinson.

Picture by Simon Hulme

Picture by Simon Hulme

She raised almost £2m for charity by tackling a series of challenges despite being diagnosed with incurable cancer.

Runners could opt to raise money for any cause but the event’s charity partners include Martin House Children’s Hospice, Candlelighters and Macmillan Cancer Support.

Travelling into York along University Road, runners entered the city through Walmgate Bar. They continued along Parliament Street before passing York Minster and exiting the old city through Monk Bar.

The route then took runners north east towards Stockton-on- the-Forest and on to Upper Helmsley and Sand Hutton. The course headed south towards Buttercrambe Moor Wood and on to Stamford Bridge, where it turned before heading back towards York.

Runners continued towards Murton before turning and heading north into Holtby. The route then continued into the village of Murton, via Bad Bargain Lane and under the A64 towards Osbaldwick and back to the grand finale.

By Richard Ponter

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