£1m to demolish five “eyesore” Leeds council buildings

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Five Leeds council-owned buildings which had fallen into major disrepair are to be knocked down - at a cost to the taxpayer of almost £1m - and the land sold off for redevelopment.

The “eyesore” buildings on the junction of Roundhay Road and Barrack Road - among them a former day centre for older people and those with behavioural problems, as well as former council offices - are “exhibiting major defects and or serious risk of imminent failure”, according to a condition survey.

A report by the council’s Asset Management team says the authority has tried to identify alternative uses but it is obvious the buildings “are beyond their economical lifespan and refurbishment to an acceptable standard...would be very costly”

Report author Dave Graham says: “Based on the risk and cost of leaving the building standing vacant and the prospects of any future plans for development of the site, the demolition of the whole site is the

most cost effective option.”

The buildings have been empty for some time and, although they have been made safe, have still become a magnet for vandalism.

“[This] places pressures and demands on the resources of numerous services across the authority,” the report adds.

“There are proposals for redevelopment of the whole site and to enable these to be brought forward to meet city wide and local needs the best solution is to have the existing buildings demolished and the site cleared.

“The site as it stands is somewhat of an eyesore in the area and a magnet for intruders, vandalism and unsociable behaviour.

“The demolition of the buildings will deal with a number of issues and concerns raised by not only by LCC departments but also by the local community.”

Demolition work is expected to start at the beginning of March and should be completed in June.

The estimated cost of the demolition works is £964,560.

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