New woodland-themed library at Leeds primary school

BOOKWORMS: Members of the school council  in the new Gledhow Primary School library.
BOOKWORMS: Members of the school council in the new Gledhow Primary School library.
0
Have your say

Young bookworms at Gledhow Primary School will now be able to curl up with a book in their new state-of-the-art woodland-themed library.

Children’s author Andy Seed was guest of honour to officially open the new library which pupils excitedly received their library cards for this week.

The space for the library – which has the capacity for 7,000 books – was made possible due to school’s recent building work allowing it to expand to become a three-form entry.

The school’s Parent and Staff Association (PSA) fundraised £15,000 towards the library through book-themed events such as book trails and a readathon.

Parent Chloe Smith, of the PSA said pupils and parents were also heavily involved in the design process.

“We had a competition to come up with a design for the library. We tried to input children’s ideas as much as possible and encouraged parents and kids to get involved.

“It is a woodland theme. There are green bookshelves and trees, and a reading tree where the trunk is also a book shelf. There are also beanbags and rugs and cushions to create nice places for a story or just to relax and read.

“There are also trees and wild animals on the walls, such as owls and hedgehogs. It’s a really lovely big space.”

Headteacher Mark Trudgill said the library will “greatly enhance reading for pleasure” at the schools and said, being involved in the design process has given the children a “ great sense of pride and ownership.”

He added: “‘One enthusiastic pupil commented, ‘I think it’s really cool that we’ve managed to get the new library - it looks really good. You can see all the books that are waiting to be read and I can’t wait for it to open so we can use them.’”

Castleton Mills in Armley, Leeds, which has undergone a transformation. 
Picture by Simon Hulme

Potential lies in our ‘disappearing’ historic textile mills, says heritage body