New look new Leeds office for brokers

MODERN WORKPLACE: The new Willis Towers Watson office at number 5 Wellington Place.
MODERN WORKPLACE: The new Willis Towers Watson office at number 5 Wellington Place.
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A global broking and solutions company has completed one of the biggest city centre re-location deals by moving into the most recently completed building at Wellington Place.

Willis Towers Watson is expanding its office occupancy in the city by taking two floors and 26,500 square feet in number 5, which has been completed by commercial property developer and asset manager, MEPC.

Willis Towers Watson has re-located from numbers 1 and 2 Wellington Place after 17 years.

The re-location will also help the firm’s expansion as the number of employees is set to expand from 80 to 245.

It allows all teams to be under one roof and for Willis Towers Watson to approach a more modern and flexible way of working with the interior design and layout of the office.

The company also sourced 80 per cent of the materials from Yorkshire based firms.

Slavica Sedlan, Managing Consultant at Willis Towers Watson, said: “I am thrilled with our new office and proud that so much has been sourced in Yorkshire.

“After significant growth of our business in Leeds I was delighted that MEPC could accommodate our expansion into newly completed 5 Wellington Place.

“Since making the move a little over a week ago, we have already seen a great response to our new space from clients and a huge buzz in the office as our staff embrace their new work place.”

James Dipple, CEO of MEPC added: “We’ve worked hard to create the ideal office space, community and environment so I’m really pleased Willis Towers Watson have decided to expand and settled in with such ease. As we continue to develop more buildings, we are welcoming the growth of our occupiers and also welcoming big names to the area.”

Castleton Mills in Armley, Leeds, which has undergone a transformation. 
Picture by Simon Hulme

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