New community for the heart of Leeds

View of Holbeck

View of Holbeck

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A new community could soon be created in Leeds as part of a strategy to turn the city into the major economic centre of the Government’s Northern Powerhouse.

Offices, bars, restaurants, homes and leisure facilities could soon be built on the Holbeck Portfolio, a collection of prime development sites in the heart of Leeds.

The site has been acquired by Commercial Estates Group (CEG) for £9.6m, and the new owners are drawing up plans to regenerate the area.

Jon Kenny, a spokesman for CEG, told the Yorkshire Evening Post: “This is a key city centre destination and CEG’s plans will mix some of the area’s historic architecture with iconic new buildings befitting of a new city quarter.

“The proposals, which are set to be unveiled later this year, include a vibrant mix of high quality offices, residential, bars, restaurants and leisure facilities putting this new quarter on the Leeds city map as a place to live, work and visit.

“CEG has been considering the opportunity presented by these assets for some time based on our success elsewhere in the city, in particular Kirkstall Forge.

“This is a real opportunity for our key landholdings to drive the regeneration of this wider area, supporting Leeds’ aspirations to be the economic driver of not only the region, but the entire Northern Powerhouse.”

RBS has sold the portfolio, which totals 5.86 acres, in a deal that was completed by Yorkshire-based property specialist Gent Visick.

The portfolio comprises seven separate plots in Holbeck Urban Village on the Leeds South Bank.

The plots include a mixture of cleared land, along with income producing and vacant industrial premises.

Rupert Visick, who is the director of Gent Visick, said the freehold sale of The Holbeck Portfolio represented “the next piece of the jigsaw” for the ambitious future vision for the area.

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