Multiple fire engines called to blaze in high-rise tower block in Leeds

Marlborough Towers, Leeds
Marlborough Towers, Leeds
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Multiple fire engines have been called to a blaze on the 15th floor of a high-rise tower block in Leeds tonight.

Fire crews were called to a flat on the 15th floor of Marlborough Towers in Park Lane, Leeds, at 7.30pm tonight.

The blaze is now out but fire crews are still at the scene as of about 9pm.

Six fire engines were sent to the scene of the blaze, which was contained within one flat and did not spread.

Brigade chiefs said earlier this week that there had been eight "small fires" in high-rise buildings in West Yorkshire since the Grenfell disaster.

The causes of the incidents have included cooking, careless disposal of cigarettes and combustible items being left too close to a heater.

As a precautionary measure, the West Yorkshire brigade now sends six fire engines - including one with high-reach capability - to any confirmed fire at a high-rise building.

UPDATE: West Yorkshire Fire Service has released this statement:

"At 19:31 hours today West Yorkshire Fire Control received a 999 call from a resident at Marlborough Towers, Park Lane at Leeds.

"The caller reported that there was smoke coming from a flat on the 15th floor. Following further questioning it was ascertained that the fire was contained within a flat on the 15th floor.

"On arrival the pre determined attendance of 7 fire appliances and an aerial appliance, crews quickly got to work to control the fire within the flat. crews used 2 jets, 1 hose reel and 2 breathing apparatus to help fight the fire. As previously emphasized the fire was contained to the flat, at no stage were other flats involved or affected by the fire.

"Fire appliances from Leeds, Killingbeck, Hunslet, Moortown, stations attended the incident along with specialist officers trained to deal with and coordinate this type of incident."

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