DCSIMG

Letter: Leeds left withering on the vine for 10 years

On Monday January 28, Paul Wray blamed the coalition government for making cuts to Leeds City Council.

I shouldn’t have to remind Mr Wray that Labour had been in power 10 years before sleepwalking us to disaster, while lecturing us on how it could never happen under them.

Before that they could have paid off debt from oil and gas revenue, they chose to buy votes with welfare payments instead.

In my view Labour should be remembered for what they did after the crash, they could have let the rich lose a chunk of their collective wealth, but instead they stuck the tab on the country.

The country as a whole owes 12 trillion pounds, five times its annual income.

Mr Wray wants more houses built, I suspect with peppercorn rents, he should dream on. I understand the need because Labour increased net migration by 2,000,000 that’s the population of Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and York all added together, only 20% were from the EU.

Subsidies only breed incompetence, and boy have we got a bunch of incompetent councillors.

I have never heard one single councillor criticise the West Yorkshire Transport Plan, even though it has led to Yorkshire and Leeds withering on the vine over the last ten years

James Lewis needs to demonstrate how a bus will deliver 25 one-ton pallets to a supermarket.

Bernard Atha needs to explain how doubling parking charges will revitalise our city shops.

Any one of the rest needs to explain how many pedestrians we have to encourage on to our roads as a priority, and how this will help to pay down our debts.

We mainly need to see our councillors to complain about the things they get wrong in the first place.

I suggest we get rid of every third one, and use the saving to fund internet voting on everything, with everyone’s national insurance number as their email address.

This would be fairer than holding meetings when working people are still commuting, or too tired to attend.

Bob Nicol, Leeds

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page