Leeds roundabout sign confusion

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It’s the Leeds suburb that has become famous thanks to Children in Need but it seems some people still cannot get the name right.

A large road sign at the Wickes roundabout near Pudsey spells the town’s name ‘Pudesy’.

Local residents Margaret and Antony Clift have lived in the area for more than 40 years and their house sits next to the misspelled sign at the junction of Gamble Hill Drive and Pudsey Road.

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Grandfather-of-three Antony, 76, said: “I couldn’t believe it when I first saw it. Some people have commented on it and I’ve taken pictures of it myself to show friends because it’s quite funny.

“It’s weird because people know that the town has links with Children in Need and Pudsey Bear so you would think they would get it right.

“It just seems a bit silly to have the wrong spelling.”

Wife Margaret, 75, said: “Drivers will probably find it confusing.

“I sometimes stand at the bus stop looking at the sign and think, ‘That’s not right,’ but we just go with the flow.”

Lauren Charnley, 25, has lived in Pudsey her whole life.

She said: “It’s a bit embarrassing to see such an obvious mistake on such a massive road sign.

“It should really be changed but I think people round here have got used to it now.”

Coun Josephine Jarosz (Lab, Pudsey) said: “The roundabout by Wickes is quite confusing as it is.

“I think the sign ought to be changed and a total review of all signs around it also needs to be done.”

After being contacted by the Yorkshire Evening Post, Leeds City Council has now said the sign will be corrected.

A spokesman said: “There was an error made by the sign manufacturer that the contractor used.

“They have been made aware of it and we are hopeful that it will be replaced and corrected by the middle of January.”

The town lends its name to Pudsey Bear - the mascot of the BBC’s annual fundraising marathon Children in Need.

Pudsey was an independent town until it became part of the metropolitan borough of the City of Leeds in 1974.

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