Leeds M&S staff and volunteers help out charity

M&S employees and volunteers kicked-off Spark Something Good with numerous community projects across Leeds and Bradford.
M&S employees and volunteers kicked-off Spark Something Good with numerous community projects across Leeds and Bradford.
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Marks & Spencer staff and volunteers kicked off an ambitious charity project this week that will involve 24 community projects taking place within a week.

The Yorkshire leg of M&S’s Spark Something Good campaign began at the firm’s Leeds store where more than 70 people took part in a Making for Charity sewing workshop.

The volunteers made syringe driver bags for cancer patients at hospital wards and hospices across the county.

Julie Taylor, who set up Making For Charity in 2011, said: “The response from patients has been amazing and the feedback we get is that it brings a smile to their face to know that other people are thinking of them.

“Each bag is donated to one person and they are not transferable due to the risk of cross infection, which means that there is a constant demand.

“I was thrilled when M&S approached me to get involved with Spark Something Good and I’ve been delighted with the turnout so far at M&S Leeds.”

A total of 24 community projects will take place in Leeds and Bradford over the next seven days, with a view to inspire people to donate their time to volunteering.

Mark Robson, Plan A champion at Marks & Spencer Leeds, said: “Following the success of Spark Something Good since the launch in London last summer, we’re really excited to be launching this initiative in two great Yorkshire cities. It was difficult to choose just 24 projects but we have some really worthy causes on board. With our M&S employees and the Leeds and Bradford community working together to volunteer with organisations that really matter locally, we know we can achieve something great.”

Tower Works  in Globe Rd, Leeds, part of the 
South Bank regeneration area of Leeds. Picture: Tony Johnson.

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