Leeds Festival 2012: Day Two review

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IT was Saturday and the crowd was in love with The Cure as they took to the stage on day two (August 25) of Leeds Festival.

Front man Robert Smith, with his trade mark back-combed hair, treated fans to a dreamy two-and-a-half hour set.

Arms swayed and feet thumped along to lovelorn classics Pictures of You, High, A Forest, Lullaby, The Lovecats and The Caterpillar (girl).

But it was always going to be Friday I’m in Love - smartly slapped bang in the middle of the band’s back catalogue - and 1979 classic Boys Don’t Cry that would draw the loudest cheers.

Earlier in the day Deaf Havana opened the main stage with a modest gathering of bleary eyed and shivering folk in a drizzly late morning fog.

Bombay Bicycle Club and Crystal Castles, who are fast becoming Leeds Festival regulars, were this year promoted to the main stage.

But as ever the festival didn’t really come to life until darkness had fallen over Bramham Park.

The Cure were by this point only a third of the way into their mammoth set, but other corners of the festival field were now reaching full throttle.

Relative newbies Foster the People were turning up the heat inside a sticky NME/Radio 1 tent.

Glittery silver foil paper was fired high above the bouncing crowd as the American three-piece, who were warming up for stage headliners’ The Maccabees, finally reached it’s crescendo with hit single Pumped up Kids.

Before them Manchester’s The Courteeners and former Blur guitarist Graham Coxon had played a more sobering set for a more sober audience.

Original American punk rockers headlined the Lock Up Stage with Anti-Flag followed by Social Distortion.

And as music fans dashed between beer tents and stages, fairground attractions and lavatories in the run up to the witching hour, it was The Cure who played on until lights out at around 11pm.

Of course that was not the end of the party, as unofficial after shows continued back at the campsites.

Raymond Manners.

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