Leeds dangerous driver ploughed into parked cars

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AN UNINSURED driver crashed into a row of parked cars during a police chase through the streets of Leeds.

Ashley Napier was the subject of a suspended prison sentence for causing grievous bodily harm at the time of the incident on September 12 this year.

Leeds Crown Court heard police became suspicious when they saw him driving a Vauxhall Corsa with L plates along Armley Ridge Road.

Napier suddenly turned into Cockshott Lane and drove away at speed. Napier then turned into the path of a bus travelling in the opposite direction, narrowly avoiding a head-on collision. Robert Galley, prosecuting, said a passenger in Napier’s car grabbed hold of the steering wheel during the pursuit as he appeared to be losing control.

The incident ended when Napier struck a fence before hitting three parked cars on Whyther Park Hill. Napier was found hiding in a garden nearby. The court heard he has previous convictions including possession of an imitation firearm.

Napier, 22, of Stonebridge Grove, Farnley, pleaded guilty to dangerous driving, failing to stop, no insurance, no licence, breach of a suspended sentence and failing to attend for unpaid work. He was jailed for two years.

Anthony Sugare, mitigating, said Napier had committed the offence as he panicked when officers indicated for him to stop.

He added that Napier had failed to continue doing unpaid work since the incident because he could “not see a great deal of point” as he knew he would be going to custody. Mr Sugare said: “This is the first time among a number of previous convictions that he has been convicted for driving.”

Judge Neil Clark also banned Napier from driving for 35 months.

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