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You can help give Leeds ‘miracle baby’ gift of sight

Lyle Duckworth and mum Paula. PIC: Bruce Rollinson

Lyle Duckworth and mum Paula. PIC: Bruce Rollinson

A £25,000 treatment in Thailand could give this Leeds “miracle baby” the gift of sight.

Lyle Duckworth was born 15 weeks premature and had to be resuscitated at birth.

He pulled through – but had suffered two bleeds to the brain which doctors warned were so serious that on four occasions they advised his parents Paula McGregor and Lee Duckworth to turn off the machines keeping him alive.

They refused and Lyle has defied predictions to become an alert and happy toddler.

However the 19-month-old is registered blind and the NHS cannot offer him any more treatment, so his family are now fundraising for the cost of stem cell injections abroad.

Paula, 30, said: “I just want to give him the best chance.

“If we didn’t do it, we’d always be wondering. For him to be able to see us would be amazing.”

Lyle, from Whinmoor, Leeds, weighed just 1lb 13ozs when he was born.

He was on a ventilator for six weeks and then diagnosed with bleeding to the brain due to him being starved of oxygen. Medics feared he might not survive.

“He’s a miracle. They asked us on four different occasions to turn the machines off, but we said no,” his mum said.

The youngster, who also suffers from hydrocephalus, was allowed home aged 12 weeks.

Paula, who has two older children Lee, 10, and Kayleigh, eight, said: “He has done really well. They said he would never feed or breathe on his own.”

Medics think Lyle can only make out light and dark, and he cannot use his left side.

There is now nothing more the NHS can offer for his sight, so after research, his parents decided to take him for treatment later this year which it is hoped will repair his optic nerve.

Already £8,000 has been collected and the next event is a fundraising night at Swarcliffe WMC on March 28 at 7pm.

Visit www.justgiving.com/paula-mcgregor1 or text 70070 Lyle49 and the amount.

 

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