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Wakefield Museum may bid for treasure trove find

The brooch; it is square in section and one half is twisted to make a decorative effect  the pin, which is missing, would have divided the decorated area from the plain area.

The brooch; it is square in section and one half is twisted to make a decorative effect  the pin, which is missing, would have divided the decorated area from the plain area.

A medieval silver brooch has become the latest historic treasure to be unearthed in Wakefield district.

A treasure trove inquest at Wakefield Coroner’s Court heard how the brooch was found by a Castleford man who had been metal detecting on farmland in North Elmsall in September last year.

Recognising it as a significant find, the metal detectorist reported it to the local Portable Antiquities Service, which has since been liaising with the British Museum.

West Yorkshire Coroner David Hinchliff said: “According to a museum expert, the find dated back to the 13th and 14th century from anywhere between 1200 and 1400 AD.”

Wakefield Museum chiefs are interested in buying the brooch, which is being kept by the British Museum ahead of valuation.

Recording the find as treasure, Mr Hinchliff said: “It’s nice to do these things rather than dealing with death and destruction like we usually do.”

Under the Treasure Act of 1996, all items that are more than 300 years old and contain at least 10 per cent of gold or silver must be reported to the coroner in the district where they were found.

In July 2011, Owen Johnson, 53, discovered just under 600 gold and silver coins in a ceramic pot – made in Wrenthorpe – while digging in his garden at High Ackworth.

The coins could have been stashed underground between 1645 and 1646 by a Royalist who feared it would be looted by Roundhead troops, at around the same time as the siege of nearby Pontefract Castle.

A gold ring bearing the inscription “When this you see, remember me” was also found.

An inquest at Wakefield Coroner’s Court in March ruled the find belongs to the state.

Wakefield Council chiefs are now appealing to the public to help raise £5,500 of the £54,500 needed to buy The Ackworth Hoard for future display at Pontefract Museum.

In February 2010, a metal detectorist found a 17th century golden love token on pastureland in Allerton Bywater.

The oval shaped letter seal is embossed with an image of an arrow piercing a heart.

 

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