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Tasty treats on menu in Wakefield at celebration of fine food

Preparations for the Wakefield Festival of Food, Drink and Rhubarb

Preparations for the Wakefield Festival of Food, Drink and Rhubarb

Wakefield is offering the perfect recipe for a day out this weekend as it stages a celebration of its proud rhubarb-growing tradition.

The annual Wakefield Festival of Food, Drink and Rhubarb got under way yesterday and runs until tomorrow.

Visitors to the city centre event can look forward to a packed programme of culinary-themed entertainment, including stalls, walks and tours.

Top chefs such as TV’s Simon Rimmer will be serving up kitchen demonstrations in a cookery theatre on the Cathedral Precinct.

And there will also be the chance to track down some tasty bargains at a food market, again taking place on the Cathedral Precinct.

Now in its eighth year, the festival is organised by Wakefield Council.

Speaking ahead of yesterday’s launch, the council’s cabinet member for sport, culture and libraries, Coun David Dagger, said: “This year’s festival is sure to be fantastic, with lots to see and do for all the family. I hope as many people as possible come along to see what we have to offer and join in the many activities available. We’re excited about the chefs that will be joining us for the festival and I’m sure they will attract people from across the country.”

The festival runs from 10am to 5pm today and from 10am to 4pm tomorrow.

For further information about the weekend’s programme, visit the www.experiencewakefield.co.uk website.

Wakefield is part of a rhubarb-growing triangle that also includes Leeds and Morley.

The plant – which can be ‘forced’ by growing it indoors under dark and warm conditions – has been an important element of the local economy for more than 150 years. Yorkshire forced rhubarb was awarded special designation of origin status by the European Commission’s protected food name scheme in 2010, putting it in the same bracket as grub like Melton Mowbray pork pies, Stilton cheese and Parma ham.

 

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