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Pupils take the £10 note relay challenge

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A group of West Yorkshire schoolchildren are taking part in a ten pound challenge - the UK’s first ever enterprise relay at Freeston Academy.

The Tenner Relay will see a £10 note travel the length of the country, challenging school children along the way to turn it into more money by doing something creative and enterprising.

It is Britain’s biggest nationwide enterprise competition for young people, which will see over 250,000 school pupils across the UK competing to turn their £10 into a larger sum of money over a period of a month.

The children of Freeston Academy in Wakefield will contribute to the relay and are setting up a Valentine’s gift business.

The team spent their £10 on silk roses and sweets which students can pre-order as gifts for each other. The Valentine’s gifts will then be delivered by the team on February 14.

Jo Braham, of Freeston Academy said: “We’re really looking forward to the challenge and are hoping we can raise some money for the British Heart Foundation. Students in our school start their enterprise activities in Year 9, as we offer an enterprise and employability course which is equivalent to half a GCSE.

“Feedback from our students regarding all our enterprising activities is that it helps them learn about business, profit and loss, teamwork, marketing and branding, as well as gaining confidence and helping them make new friends.”

The Tenner scheme is run by Young Enterprise, the country’s largest enterprise education charity.

The competition has produced thousands of young business stars since its inception in 2007.

Michael Mercieca, chief executive of Young Enterprise, said: “The Tenner relay is aimed to unite like-minded students from different regions of the country to participate on one team towards a charitable cause, but most importantly to have fun while doing it.

“We want the relay to provide a platform for the main competition and help unleash the potential of young people in Britain by inspiring ideas and creativity.”

Details at the Tenner website, www.tenner.org.uk.

 

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