DCSIMG

Parents warned over summer risk of dog bites

Layla Musse, who was scarred in a dog attack in Leeds

Layla Musse, who was scarred in a dog attack in Leeds

New figures have revealed Leeds has some of the highest rates of dog attacks in the country.

In 2013, dog bites and strikes caused more than 6,700 hospital admissions in England - up six per cent from the previous year.

Attacks were three times more likely in deprived areas. In south and east Leeds there were 76 incidents which was the fifth highest rate among 210 NHS clinical commissioning groups in England.

Wakefield had 92 incidents, which was the sixth highest rate of hospital admissions per 100,000 people.

Overall, West Yorkshire saw the third highest rate of attacks among 25 NHS areas nationwide, according to figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre.

The figures come after a series of horrific incidents in Leeds. In December, pregnant mum Emma Bennett, 27, suffered fatal injuries when she was attacked by two dogs in a house in East End Park.

The family of six-year-old Layla Musse, of Burmantofts, who was left scarred for life after a dog attack in December, last month condemned a judge’s decision to return the animal to its owner.

Just last week, a two-year-old toddler was taken to hospital after he was bitten on the head by a dog in Cross Flatts Park, Beeston, only days after a boy was bitten in the same park by another dog.

The figures suggest attacks are more common in summer months.

Caroline Kisko, secretary of the Kennel Club, said with summer approaching, it was a good time for parents to speak to their children about dog safety.

“Dogs are a huge part of our lives in Britain and children are naturally curious and excited to be around them, so it is crucial that they are taught from an early age how best to interact with them,” she said.

 

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