DCSIMG

New cycleways star in post-Tour de France vision for Leeds

Metro chairman Coun James Lewis and Ginny Leonard celebrate the green light being given for the �29m Leeds to Bradford cycle superhighway earlier this year. Picture by Tony Johnson

Metro chairman Coun James Lewis and Ginny Leonard celebrate the green light being given for the �29m Leeds to Bradford cycle superhighway earlier this year. Picture by Tony Johnson

  • by Jonathan Brown
 

Leeds City Council is looking to bid for more ‘cycle superhighways’ and create two ‘closed circuit cycleways’ as it aims to build a two-wheeled legacy from the Tour de France’s visit to the city.

The projects are among suggestions to be discussed by the council’s executive board on June 25, as the countdown to the July 5 and 6 Yorkshire Grand Depart continues.

A report to the authority suggests a new council-led ‘Cycling Starts Here’ Programme Board be set up with key stakeholders in Leeds to help form a cycling strategy for the city aiming to make the activity safer, more appealing and accessible.

It looks to build on the £29m CityConnect segregated cycle superhighway, funded by the Government, the council and Metro, under construction from east Leeds to Bradford, with the addition of similar segregated lanes through further funding bids.

Plans for two closed circuit cycle tracks including a 3km route away from roads, which can be used for leisure or competition, are also in the pipeline.

Council leader Coun Keith Wakefield said: “This is our chance to be bold, ambitious and creative by bringing together all key stakeholders, their views and ideas to make cycling something which is all-inclusive with no barriers to participation and at the heart of Leeds as a modern city of the future.”

Using Cycle Yorkshire, the official Grand Depart legacy strategy, as a starting point, the vision includes extending Bikeability training, looking at travel to school, supporting cycle clubs and inputting 20mph zones around all schools in Leeds.

Infrastructure to add to Leeds’ 82km of existing cycleways and lanes, 480 public cycle parking places and 22km of recreational routes could be boosted by the creation of more cycling events and work with British Cycling including schemes and events for disabled riders, along with stronger safety measures.

Bike loan and recycling schemes and better online cycling resources are also among suggestions to encourage more people to saddle up post-Tour.

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