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Leeds girl talks about her dyslexia in documentary

Sophie Paylor.

Sophie Paylor.

  • by Juliette Bains
 

Shy schoolgirl Sophie Paylor will leave her homework behind and walk along the red carpet alongside stars of the silver screen this weekend.

The 10-year-old, from Cookridge in Leeds, has been invited to the BAFTA’s Children’s Awards for a documentary detailing her battle with dyslexia.

The programme, called Same But Different, followed Sophie’s life at school and was broadcast on BBC2 this year.

Sophie told the YEP: “Dyslexia affects me because I have to have help with spellings and literacy but I am getting better at them now.

“I really enjoyed being on camera. It felt special and it was really fun. I’m excited to go to London and have already got my outfit ready.”

The Holy Trinity Primary School pupil will attend the glittering awards ceremony at The Hilton in Park Lane, London, with her mum Christine on Sunday.

The documentary, which was made by Libra Television, is nominated in the primary school learning category.

The show featured children with a range of disabilities and is now being used in school assemblies and personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) lessons to encourage understanding and inclusion.

Same But Different will do battle with fellow BBC2 shows Little Stargazing, Seeking Refuge and True Stories.

Sophie’s mum Christine said: “When Sophie was told she was dyslexic last year, she was very low and it took a while for her to process that it was actually a lifelong thing.

“She had lost a lot of confidence so we thought being in the film would boost her.

“It helped her realise that there are other people like her.

“In the film she is so articulate and her head teacher said she did a great job.

“Sophie is chirpy and enthusiastic and just a lovely girl. We are so proud of her.

“She is accepting of her dyslexia now and understands that she has problems with her spelling but that it isn’t the end of the world.”

Speaking about Sunday’s awards ceremony, she added: “Even if we don’t win, it is a chance in a lifetime.

“We are both very excited.”

 

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