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Commemorative bench in memory of tireless Leeds campaigner Ivy

Commemorative bench in memory of IVy Needham. 
Pictured the presentation of the bench, with Ivy's daughter and son, Wendy Fletcher and Kingsley Needham with Ivy's guide dog Rosie sat on the new bench. 
Picture by Gerard Binks.

Commemorative bench in memory of IVy Needham. Pictured the presentation of the bench, with Ivy's daughter and son, Wendy Fletcher and Kingsley Needham with Ivy's guide dog Rosie sat on the new bench. Picture by Gerard Binks.

  • by Alison Bellamy
 

VETERAN campaigner Ivy Needham has been honoured with a commemorative bench.

The seat was unveiled yesterday in memory of the battling pensioner, from south Leeds, who died in December aged 88, outside the Leeds office of Action for Blind People and the Leeds Vision Consortium Fairfax House.

Ivy’s daughter, Wendy Fletcher said: “My brother Kingsley and I are so proud of mum; she is still shining from up there. It’s a lovely tribute and shows that people thought so much of her.”

Laurie Hudson said: “Ivy did a lot for Middleton and Belle Isle. She was a gem. She worked hard for Guide Dogs and Help for Heroes.

She was always there to offer advice and support to her peers.”

Norma Robertson said: “I knew her for a long time. She was a good campaigner and advisor and a loyal friend. She was always there to offer help and support to others. She knew how to kick butt! I am proud to have been able to call her a friend. I miss her.”

Ethel Elliot said: “ She tied herself to the railings at number 10 and took on Tony Blair. She had tea with the Queen. She was well known for the good work she did. She was a remarkable woman.”

Councillor Adam Ogilvie said: “Ivy really was an incredible campaigner for many a deserving cause. She made a positive difference to the lives of so many people in Leeds, so it’s only fitting that she has a lasting tribute like this.”

Lesley Sharp, from Action for Blind People, said: “Ivy was a true inspiration. Deaf-blindness shouldn’t be a barrier to leading an active life, but for some people, diagnosis of visual impairment or hearing loss is understandably a shattering experience.

“She proved that life goes on, and in a very active way. At Action for Blind People and LVC, we wanted to provide the city of Leeds with a lasting memory of this incredible lady. That’s why we decided to present this commemorative bench, something which can be shared by everyone in the community; just as Ivy would have wanted.”

 

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