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Blog lessons in Leeds prove to be world wide hit

Teacher Gemma Zincke with bloggers Fletcher Bamford, Katie Proctor and Fegor Johnson.

Teacher Gemma Zincke with bloggers Fletcher Bamford, Katie Proctor and Fegor Johnson.

English lessons with a modern twist at a Pudsey junior school are being shared with pupils around the world.

Work created by Year 6 pupils from Fulneck Junior School, in west Leeds, are being viewed and commented on by school children from no fewer than 43 different countries around the world.

Teacher Gemma Zincke, introduced blogging into the ten and 11-year-olds’ English lessons last year, to much acclaim.

With Miss Zincke’s help, the youngsters then share their school work on an educational internet site, which is aimed at fostering links around the globe, in addition to boosting reading and writing skills.

Miss Zincke, who first began the blogging lessons whilst teaching at a previous school in Monaco, said: “When I introduced the blogging sessions last year, I didn’t know how popular they would become.

“The lessons encourage learning and they help the children with their reading and writing.

“In addition, the Fulneck pupils are now interacting with children from all over the globe. As well as their work being viewed by pupils from 43 different countries, they too are able to look at, and comment on, the work of their overseas peers.

“This is an interesting and exciting concept for the pupils and adds another dimension to their English lessons.”

She said that the blogging sessions, which are an extension of our normal English lessons, were proving increasingly popular with the pupils and encourage learning.

In addition to helping them with their reading and writing, it gives them the opportunity to interact with children across the UK and the globe. Their work has been viewed thousands of times from youngsters living in as diverse places as Liverpool and New Jersey.

Miss Zincke, who has also introduced her class to Twitter, added: “The blog we subscribe to helps the pupils to think creatively, and, of course, with their work under world-wide scrutiny, they ensure it is as well written as possible. They in turn are able to view and comment on the work of others, which helps build friendships around the world.”

 

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