Invitation to ‘Be Curious’

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People can see one of the most powerful electron microscopes in the world at the University of Leeds’ ‘Be Curious’ event.

The university is hosting the free event tomorrow to showcase some of its research to members of the public.

Stalls, talks and guided trails for all ages will focus on five zones of activity: Science and Engineering, Culture, Climate and Water, Cities, and Health. Dr Charlotte Haigh, head of public engagement at the University of Leeds, said: “Be Curious is about giving everyone the opportunity to have fun and find out more about the world-leading research happening at the university. This year we’re focusing on the relevance of our research to the people of Leeds and our region as a whole, with events for people of all ages.”

Leeds has some of the most powerful electron microscopes in the world. Visitors to Be Curious can join a 30 minute tour and see how researchers use super-cold liquid nitrogen to prepare samples and have a go at driving the microscopes. They can learn how to research their family using collections held at Leeds University Library and Leeds Central Library and find out how Yorkshire’s climate is expected to change in the coming decades.

Other highlights include ‘Cryptography: Creating and breaking into secrets’ which gives people an opportunity to take home their own personal decoder.

Visitors can also learn about the history of The Pavilion, a contemporary art organisation, and check out the film programme at the Hyde Park Picture House in the evening.

Be Curious, which is running as part of Leeds Festival of Science, will take place from 10am to 4pm at the University of Leeds’ Parkinson Building.

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