Micro scooters help poorly patients at Leeds Children’s Hospital

Liver patient Amy Lester and play specialist Lisa Beaumont.

Liver patient Amy Lester and play specialist Lisa Beaumont.

0
Have your say

Micro scooters will help poorly patients at Leeds Children’s Hospital make a speedy recovery.

Six of the machines will be zipping around the corridors thanks to a donation from a national firm.

They will be used to help inspire children to get moving about after surgery and support their physiotherapy.

Youngsters on the paediatric liver, renal and gastro ward at Leeds General Infirmary were the first to try them out.

Amy Lester was soon zipping up and down, despite having her third liver transplant less than two weeks ago.

The 13-year-old’s mum Helen Shaw said: “It’s really great to give them something to do.

“She was getting a bit fed up and frustrated.”

Amy, from Mansfield, has needed three transplants over 18 months after first becoming ill with a bowel condition. She is so far doing well following her third op on February 18.

Another transplant patient, eight-year-old Amaan Akram, also tried out the new toys.

He has previously had a kidney transplant and was in hospital following an investigation.

His mum Nusrat Bano, from Bradford, said the donation was very kind: “It’s really good and the children love them.”

Even little Leo Finch, who was under doctors’ orders to rest in his room following a biopsy, got a chance to sit on one of the smallest scooters.

The three-year-old had an emergency liver transplant last December after becoming very ill with complications linked to hepatitis.

His dad Andy, from Sheffield, said: “It’s brilliant. They need so much on wards like this as there a lot of kids who are really ill like Leo was.

“It’s all going to make them feel more at home.”

The scooters were given by Micro Scooters UK as part of their scheme to donate to children’s hospitals across the UK.

Lisa Beaumont, play specialist on the ward, said they were delighted.

“The scooters will be able to be used for children to be able to go to different departments in the hospital for procedures and X-rays, to make it more fun and enjoyable.

“We’ll also use them to motivate children after transplantation - it’s an exciting thing to get them out of bed – and we can use them with the physios in lots of different ways.”

Anna Gibson and Philippa Goharty, founders of Micro Scooters UK, said: “We are pleased to be able to help these poorly children with their recovery.”

l

A brisk two minute walk could stave off heart disease