Get ready for a ‘dark shopping experience’ in Leeds

Festive: The brass band that will perform at the Leeds Hidden Market at Kirkstall Abbey next month. Picture: James Abbott-Donnelly.
Festive: The brass band that will perform at the Leeds Hidden Market at Kirkstall Abbey next month. Picture: James Abbott-Donnelly.
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There are just 52 days left to go until Christmas.

And preparations are now underway for a week of dark shopping festivities in Leeds, which will turn the traditional Christmas story on its head this year.

Kirkstall Abbey will host the Leeds Hidden Market event, from December 14 until December 21.

Based on the Brothers Grimm, the shopping show will feature live music performances, stalls and musical Bingo.

There will also be a Twisted Cabaret, brass band, aerial show and a lip-sync performance for visitors next month.

Show organiser, Julia Benfield, said: “We wanted to bring something different to Leeds this Christmas, prompting people to take a real time out, and enjoy something unique, a different world, where you forget the outside pressures, and get lost in the magic.

“We’ve created a unique environment, both interactive and immersive, mixing shopping with performance, socialising and plenty of Christmas cheer.”

The shopping experience takes place across five hours each day after it launches next month.

It will be family-friendly during the day, and adults-only at night.

Elsewhere, the town of Otley is launching its own Christmas advert in a bid to attract visitors this winter.

The advert, styled on John Lewis’ famous TV festive clips, will appear on the Visit Otley website in the run up to Christmas.

It tells a heart-wrenching tale of a lonely young man, working in London, who could miss out on Christmas Day at home in Otley.

The Kirkstall Abbey event is ticket-only, and prices start from £9.95.

For more details, or to book tickets, visit: www.wegottickets.com/hidden-christmas- market

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