Family of Leeds dad with incurable brain disease are staging charity ball

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THE family of a Leeds father who is suffering from a rare terminal brain disease is staging a charity ball to raise cash for the charity which provides support and funds research.

Dave Howarth, 58, was misdiagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2011 after suffering symptoms including tremors and weakness down the left side of his body.

Later that year it was confirmed he has rare incurable brain disease Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD), which is often misdiagnosed as a stroke or Parkinson’s.

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Mr Howarth struggles to walk and the muscles in his throat have weakened, which makes speaking so he can be heard difficult.

He had to leave his job working as a marketing executive in graphic design in 2012 after his health deteriorated.

Over the last two years his wife Cathy, 56, and daughter Charlotte, 27, along with other family and fiends, have raised £7,000 for the PSP Association – the only national charity that supports those living with brain diseases Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and CBD, and funds research into the conditions.

They are seeking to sell 170 tickets for a fundraising autumn charity ball in aid of the PSP Association, which will be held from 7pm on Saturday October 17 at Weetwood Hall Hotel on Otley Road, Leeds.

Mrs Howarth said: “Charlotte and I have both completed sponsored runs to raise funds for the PSP Association and we recently did the Three Peaks Challenge with a group of friends. Everyone has been so generous. Now, the idea of the ball is it’s an evening that people can come along to and enjoy, rather than giving us money for our sponsored events. It should be a great evening and we hope people will support us.” Tickets cost £40 each, £333 for a table of nine, or £370 for a table of ten. To buy tickets, call 07703 837883 or email catherinehowarth.bowen@gmail.com

Paula Dillon, President of Leeds Chamber Commerce.

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