What A-Level results tell us: Stats and slideshow

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Today’s A-Level results in numbers...

• There were 850,749 entrants for the exams, up 2% on last year’s total.

Twins Elspeth (left) and Annabel  Summerfield 18  from  Bootham School in York  celebrating  their A Level results.

Twins Elspeth (left) and Annabel Summerfield 18 from Bootham School in York celebrating their A Level results.

• The overall A*-E pass rate was 98.1%, up 0.1 percentage points on last year. This reverses the 0.1-point decline in 2014, which was the first time the pass rate had fallen since 1982.

• The number of candidates receiving top grades has fallen for the fourth year in a row. Entrants scoring either an A or A* was 25.9%, down from 26% in 2014.

• 8.2% of entrants received an A*, the same figure as last year.

• The gap between girls and boys receiving the top grades has narrowed to its smallest for at least 10 years. The number of girls who got A or higher was 0.4 percentage points more than the number of boys. In 2005 the gap was 2.4 percentage points.

A-level students receiving top grades by region and charts the biggest increases in entries by subject

A-level students receiving top grades by region and charts the biggest increases in entries by subject

• The most popular subject this year was maths. It was taken by 92,711 students, a rise of 4.4% on 2014.

• English was the second most popular subject. It was taken by 89,499 students, a rise of 4.9% on 2014. The third most popular subject was biology, taken by 63,275 students, a drop of 1.2% on last year.

• General studies saw the biggest drop in candidates of any subject with more than 1,000 entrants. The number fell by just under a quarter (24.3%).

• Critical thinking saw the biggest drop in candidates for any subject, falling by 55.4%.

• Computing saw the biggest jump in entrants, rising by 29.1% on 2014.

• Just over three-quarters of the overall rise in entrants was due to an increase in female candidates. There were a total of 13,415 more female entrants in 2015 than in 2014. This compares with 3,527 more male candidates.

• South-west England and the East Midlands saw the biggest year-on-year fall in the number of candidates receiving grade A or above, both dropping 0.7 percentage points.

• Eastern England, north-west England and London were the only regions to see an increase in the number of candidates receiving grade A or above, rising 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 percentage points respectively.

RESULTS IN FULL FROM ACROSS YORKSHIRE

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