Parents urged to get involved to improve computer knowledge for kids

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As primary and secondary schools begin teaching the new computing curriculum, a new series of free workshops are being offered to help parents and young people feel more confident in the digital world.

Fresh research from O2 has revealed Leeds parents don’t have the digital knowledge they need to help their children with their homework, with research showing that over two thirds of parents in Leeds did not know the computer curriculum was changing.

To help O2, is launching Guru Bytes - free sessions for parents and children over 11 to learn about the power of the web side-by-side

The company’s store at the White Rose Centre in Leeds is hosting its next workshop on October 3 at 3pm to 4.30pm.

It comes after their research shows 34 per cent of parents admitted they wouldn’t be able to support their children with their computing homework.

When tested against the new computing curriculum, two thirds admitted they did not understand what an algorithm is and over one third admitted they cannot use technology to create, organise or store digital content.

But 69 per cent of parents in Leeds said they want to help to improve their digital skills so they can better support their children’s learning.

Computing is intended to embrace the existing strengths of digital literacy and information technology in the current ICT programme of study, alongside a new strand of computer science, across all four key stages KS1-4.

The changes have been introduced as digital economy is growing rapidly, opening up opportunities for businesses and digitally skilled workers in every sector. Ben Cohen, former England rugby player and father of twin six-year-old girls, said: “Not being able to support your child with their learning is a worrying thing for a parent. No one wants to feel helpless when their kids come home from school and are stuck with their homework. Our children are growing up in a fast-paced digital world and need an entirely new set of skills that we, their parents, never learnt at school.”

For more information, visit http://www.o2.co.uk/help/everything-else/digital-family.

Christopher Lillington, assistant headteacher at Prince Henry's Grammar School.

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