Leeds teachers ‘take in food’ for hungry pupils

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ALMOST half of teachers surveyed in the region have brought food in to school for children who they fear have not had any breakfast in the morning, according to a shocking new survey.

A poll published today claims that 47 per cent of teachers said they have done this in Yorkshire – higher than anywhere else in the country.

Nationally 30 per cent of teachers said they had brought in food for pupils they feared would be hungry.

More than half of those questioned in Yorkshire – 54 per cent – said they believed there were children at their school who do not eat a lunch regularly – at least once a week.

And one-in-five said they had seen an increase in the number of children who were arriving hungry compared with this time last year.

The survey by YouGov questioned almost 900 teachers, including 81 in Yorkshire.

The survey results did not provide separate figures for Leeds teachers.

It was commissioned by Kelloggs which helps to provides breakfast clubs for schools.

Gary German, head teacher at New Bewerley Community School, Beeston, Leeds, said: “Our breakfast club started more than 15 years ago because school recognized that extra support was needed for busy families.

“This could be for a multitude of reasons like working parents needing extra childcare in the morning or dedicated, hardworking families facing economic hardships.

“The solution our breakfast club offers provides children with a comfortable, safe environment where they can feel nourished and ready for their day. It also offers parents support in the morning.

“If children come into school hungry, they are often lethargic and tired which makes them unable to apply themselves to their work. Breakfast club can combat this issue.”

The Yorkshire Evening Post has launched its Feed a Family campaign to help needy families in the city to put food on the table.

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