Court orders Leeds woman to hand over £800 after she failed to pay £75 dog fouling fine

A woman has been fined more than 800 after failing to pay a fixed penalty notice issued over dog fouling.
A woman has been fined more than 800 after failing to pay a fixed penalty notice issued over dog fouling.

A Leeds woman must stump up more than £800 after failing to pay an initial fine issued over dog fouling.

Gina Williamson was given a £75 fixed penalty notice when a member of Leeds City Council's cleaner neighbourhoods team spotted her failing to pick up mess left by her dog on a public footpath in Ashton Road, Harehills.

When she ignored two written requests to pay a fine, the council decided to take the matter to court.

They also prosecuted her for obstruction after the home address supplied by Williamson to the council officer was found to be incorrect.

Williamson, of of Darfield Crescent, Harehills, was ordered to pay a £300 fine, £30 victim surcharge and council costs of £503.34 during a hearing at Leeds Magistrates' Court earlier this month.

Coun Lucinda Yeadon, executive member for environment and sustainability, said: “Not picking up after a pet that fouls in a public area is completely irresponsible and inexcusable.

"Whilst we never want to have to resort to such measures, any dog owner who behaves in such a way can be assured that a fine will be issued if there is clear evidence they have broken the law.

“If a fixed penalty notice is given, people should also be aware that we will take further action through the courts if the payment of a fine is ignored and if for example attempts have been made to not give the correct personal details to a council warden.

"As was the case here, this could result in a much larger financial penalty than what you have had to pay through a fixed penalty notice.”

Members of the public are being warned about about rogue websites advertising fake premium rate numbers for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' cruelty line.

SCAM ALERT: People warned of fake RSPCA websites advertising premium rate numbers