Charges call against ‘supergrass’ case police

A disicplinary review into the case was commissioned by Colin  Cramphorn, who was Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police.

A disicplinary review into the case was commissioned by Colin Cramphorn, who was Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police.

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The Director of Public Prosecutions has been formally asked to reconsider the decision not to charge any officers in connection with the West Yorkshire Police supergrass scandal.

The solicitor representing a man whose murder conviction was quashed because of serious police wrongdoing has written to Keir Starmer to press for charges to be brought against police officers who showered supergrass Karl Chapman with a catalogue of improper rewards and lied in court.

Matthew Gold, representing Daniel Mansell whose 1998 conviction for murdering Wakefield pensioner Joe Smales was quashed in 2009, said: “The West Yorkshire officers responsible for the prosecution of Daniel Mansell have not been held to account for the most serious misconduct.

“As Daniel Mansell does not have any faith in how this whole shocking episode has been handled, we have written to the Director of Public Prosecutions requesting that consideration is given to bringing criminal charges against the officers. The opportunity to bring criminal proceedings has not been lost.”

The Crown Prosecution Service decided, in 2005 and 2006, there was insufficient evdience to bring charges after receiving files on more than ten officers.

In 2011, the Supreme Court delivered withering criticism of West Yorkshire Police when it ruled Mr Mansell’s brother - Paul Maxwell - should face a re-trial after his conviction for the Smales murder had also been quashed. Maxwell subsequently pleaded guilty.

The court’s judgement detailed misconduct including Chapman being allowed access to heroin and alcohol, being taken to a brothel, having a relationship with a policewoman and receiving thousands of pounds in improper rewards.

Chapman, a career criminal, had been in the custody of the police during the mid and late 1990s providing information and giving evidence in court. A lengthy North Yorkshire Police inquiry found officers had concealed Chapman’s treatment from trials in which he was the key prosecution witness.

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