‘If you love Leeds, you’ll love your new-look YEP’

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THE City of Leeds is changing – and your Yorkshire Evening Post is changing with it.

That’s the message to YEP readers today as we prepare to unveil a major redesign for the paper.

Multi-million pound developments such as the Trinity Leeds shopping centre and the First Direct Arena have recently helped cement the city’s status as one of the most go-ahead places in the UK.

Our revamp aims to reflect the YEP’s position at the heart of 21st century Leeds, with the sample pages printed here showing the lighter, brighter look and feel planned for the new-style paper.

Additions to our regular roster of stories and features, meanwhile, will include guides to the city’s top shopping bargains and the lowdown on the best spots to eat and drink in Leeds.

YEP editor Jeremy Clifford said: “I am excited about the new look and the new package we have put together making the Yorkshire Evening Post a better newspaper than it has ever been. If you love Leeds, you’ll love your new-look Yorkshire Evening Post.”

The YEP’s relaunch comes at the start of its 125th anniversary year, with our first ever edition having hit the streets on September 1, 1890.

Milestones for the paper during the 20th century included a merger with the Yorkshire Evening News in 1963 and a switch from broadsheet to the current tabloid format in 1999.

Along the way, we have consistently led the field in our coverage of our city’s big stories, be they the hunt for the Yorkshire Ripper in the 1970s or the memorable visit to Leeds by Nelson Mandela in 2001.

And, just last summer, we underlined our place at the head of the media pack with the best writing and photography from Leeds and Yorkshire’s never-to-be-forgotten Tour de France weekend.

Keep an eye on the YEP in the next few days for more details about what the paper’s bright new era has in store.

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