‘Awesome’ Leeds is great for children

Youngsters at Moortown Primary School

Youngsters at Moortown Primary School

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‘Awesome’ Leeds is a great place for children

The Yorkshire Evening Post has teamed up with Leeds City Council to support their Child Friendly Leeds campaign.

And now we are giving youngsters across the city the chance to tell readers what it is like to be a child growing up in Leeds.

Year four pupil Linda Benkreira, eight, shares her thoughts about growing up in a multicultural city.

She said: “I am eight years old and I am in year four at Moortown Primary.

I was born in the LGI where I first saw my Mum and Dad.

“I have two brothers, one at Allerton High school and other one in my school.

“I have got awesome parents. My Mum is called Patricia and my Dad is called Habib.

“My Mum is French and my Dad is Algerian.

“I am going to tell you the story of how I grew up in Leeds. I grew up with a lovely family, great friends and epic teachers.

“Also, the great place I grew up in was surrounded by great caring people.

“Furthermore, I believe that Leeds is an awesome city to be in and to have fun in.

“Now let’s talk about the environment. I really enjoy all the activities in Leeds for the kids, such as libraries, cinemas, outdoor and indoor fun, parks and museums, restaurants and many more. I really enjoy the fact that children and young people can travel around the city and make safe journeys.

“As well as that, Leeds is a multicultural city therefore, I have been able to fit in well to the lovely community. With my French and Algerian origin and my Muslim background I feel at home in Leeds.

“The best thing about growing up in Leeds is having everyone by your side and feeling safe and secure.”

Ayesha Ali, 11, said that children at her school feel like they have a voice to make decisions.

She added: “We had our old ICT suite transformed into a fabulous kitchen computer room.

“Pupils were involved in deciding what equipment to have through our school council and a lot of thought and design went into this project.”

WISHLIST FOR CHANGE

Youngsters from Moortown Primary’s School Council have drawn up a wishlist of things they would change about living in Leeds:

The first thing we would like to change is racism because everyone is equal and they deserve their own rights

We would like to make sure help is available to anyone who suffers the effects of bullying. Without help, people may get scared.

More awareness for children of the dangers they may face online to make using the internet safer.

Litter: Have you ever been to the park where there is loads of dog mess? We want a cleaner Leeds for us to play safely.

Graffiti: Although some graffiti can be artistic, we feel there is too much graffiti which makes Leeds look messy.

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